A treble clef, in Glyphs, yesterday.

Development diary, part seven

Daniel Spreadbury

It’s been almost three months since the last instalment in this series, so it’s high time for another update on our progress. In this update, as promised I will share some information about our music font, Bravura, and the project we have been leading to standardise the layout of music fonts, and some insights into how we are going to build the user interface for the new application.

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An accidental, yesterday. Courtesy starrise on flickr.

Development diary, part six

Daniel Spreadbury

In the last update, we started discussing some of the individual engines that are under development to handle atomic notation and engraving tasks, and I described the engines for note and rest grouping, and positioning rests in multiple voices. Let’s take a look at another couple of little engines that could.

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Meshing gears, courtesy Peter Nijenhuis on flickr

Development diary, part the fifth

Daniel Spreadbury

All of a sudden, over the past week I have received lots of requests for an update on our progress, so here we go. My last update was at the start of November, on the occasion of the first anniversary of our team joining Steinberg. This new update comes more or less on the occasion of the first anniversary of us starting to write our new scoring application. We’ve made a lot of progress in a year, but we still have a long way to go before the product will be in your hands.

In my last update I described the high-level design of the musical brain at the heart of our application: lots of individual engines performing single tasks, some dependent on one another, others running independently. This design approach allows us to break down the immensely complex problem of how to correctly notate and lay out music into smaller, more manageable chunks, and also provides the opportunity for these little engines to be designed and implemented independently, and eventually to run in parallel (unless an engine is dependent on the output of another engine, of course).

I described in broad terms the first couple of such engines that we had implemented already: determining the staff position of a note (taking into account clef, transposition and octave shift), and determining the stem direction of a note (taking into account staff position and musical context). We were also starting to embark on engines to handle note and rest grouping, and to position rests in multiple voices correctly. Over the next couple of posts, I’ll talk about these engines, together with a few other new ones we have developed since the last update.

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Watch Daniel on The Audio Podcast #104

Daniel Spreadbury

Today I had the pleasure of being interviewed by Scott, Adam and Samuel of The Audio Podcast about our in-development scoring application. We discuss why we need another scoring application, what benefits a Lua plug-in API might bring to users, and I completely avoid the question of when the application will be unleashed upon the world.

Thanks to the team for having me on the show! I had a great time.

old_street

Seeking a developer to join Steinberg’s scoring team

Daniel Spreadbury

Steinberg is currently looking for an experienced C++ software developer to join our team in London to help accelerate the development of our scoring application. If you’d like to join a small, close-knit team working on the next generation of scoring and composition software within a supportive and forward-looking company with a technological pedigree that is second to none, and you believe you have the right combination of skills and experience, you should consider applying.

Full details of the role are available on our web site.

Now we are one!

Development diary, part four

Daniel Spreadbury

One year ago today, my colleagues and I began work on our new scoring application in our new home at Steinberg. To mark this anniversary, I thought I would bring you right up to date with our progress. My last update took us up to the end of July, so there are three whole months to catch you up on. We’ve been continuing to work hard on getting our application’s understanding of fundamental musical concepts to be really solid, so that we can build powerful and flexible features on top of those foundations. Read on.

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unit-tests-screen

Development diary, part three

Daniel Spreadbury

In my last post, I started to bring you up to date on our progress over the past few months, and today I’m going to continue the story. You have probably by now come to expect a fair amount of nerdy detail, and hopefully I won’t disappoint.

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Project timeline

Development diary, part two

Daniel Spreadbury

It’s been four months since I last provided an update on our progress in building our new scoring application, so I thought it was about time to lift the curtain a little bit and give you some idea about what we’ve been working on. Warning: this post is pretty nerdy, and very long… and it only covers April and May.

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Hear Daniel on the SoundNotion podcast

Daniel Spreadbury

David MacDonald, Patrick Gullo, Nate Bliton and Sam Merciers were kind enough to invite me to appear on the SoundNotion podcast this week, and I had a great time chatting with them about the work we’re doing on our new scoring application, SMuFL and Bravura. You can download the podcast from the SoundNotion.tv web site, subscribe via iTunes, or watch the whole thing on YouTube. Enjoy!

The G clef in Bravura, from original symbol to finished design

Introducing Bravura, the new music font

Daniel Spreadbury

Today I’m at the Music Encoding Conference in Mainz, Germany, where I am giving a presentation on the work I have been doing over the past several months on music fonts for our new application. There are two major components to the work: firstly, a proposed new standard for how musical symbols should be laid out in a font, which I have called the Standard Music Font Layout (SMuFL to its friends, pronounced with a long “u”, so something like “smoofle”); and secondly, a new music font, called Bravura. Read on for more details.

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