Dorico showcase: Angela Gheorghiu and Il Volo at the Pavarotti 10th Anniversary Concert

Daniel Spreadbury

This post is part of a series that aims to shine a light on projects in which Dorico has played a part. If you have used Dorico for something interesting and would like to be featured in this series, please let me know.

Last Wednesday, 6 September, the Luciano Pavarotti 10th Anniversary Concert, celebrating the life and work of the great Italian tenor, took place at the Verona Arena in Italy. The concert, attended by a crowd of more than 15,000, was broadcast internationally and played host to performances from a host of top musicians.

Placido Domingo and Jose Carreras, who together with Pavarotti himself were known as The Three Tenors, both performed, as did Andrea Bocelli, Francesco Meli, Vittorio Grigolo, and others.

Also among the performers was the soprano Angela Gheorghiu, who performed not only with Carreras and Domingo, but also with Il Volo, a trio of young Italian tenors, in a performance of a new arrangement of Agustín Lara’s song Granada, the music for which was prepared in Dorico.

The piece was orchestrated by Celso Valli, and the score and parts were prepared by Patrizio Cara of Copy Music sas, one of Italy’s top music preparation experts.

This was the first major project undertaken by Patrizio in Dorico, and will no doubt be the first of many more to come.

You can see and hear the performance of Granada from the concert in this video:

Dorico is already being used by thousands of music professionals like Patrizio around the world. If you’re not yet one of them, consider downloading a free 30-day trial to experience for yourself the future of scoring.

Dorico 1.1.10 update released, with graphical chord symbol editor and more

Daniel Spreadbury

We have today released Dorico 1.1.10, the latest update to our professional music notation software, following hot on the heels of the Dorico 1.1 update that was released at the end of June.

The main focus of this update is to add graphical editing of individual chord symbols in Engrave mode, which was something that was planned for Dorico 1.1 but which needed a bit more time to get into shape. In addition to that significant bit of functionality, there are a few other minor functional improvements, and the usual crop of bug fixes. Read on for more details.

Continue reading

Come and see Dorico in Berlin, Hamburg and Treppendorf this September

Daniel Spreadbury

Product specialist Frank Heckel

Our new German Product Specialist for Dorico, Frank Heckel, will be giving three presentations about Dorico this coming September, in Berlin, Hamburg, and Treppendorf. It’s an excellent opportunity to come and hear about our new professional scoring program from an experienced and engaging expert.

Frank is a composer, orchestrator and conductor who has worked extensively on music for the concert hall and scoring stage, with many film and TV credits to his name. He has worked with scoring software for decades, and was the translator for the first German versions of Sibelius. We are excited to have Frank representing Dorico in Germany.

If you’ve been looking for a chance to find out about Dorico from a native German-speaking specialist, this is your ideal chance!

Continue reading

Dorico showcase: Canadian choral composer Andrew Gilpin

Daniel Spreadbury

This post is part of a series that aims to shine a light on projects in which Dorico has played a part. If you have used Dorico for something interesting and would like to be featured in this series, please let me know.

Andrew Gilpin is a self-taught pianist and composer who rebelled against formal music lessons at a young age, but through an exploration of many different genres and styles of music through his adolescence and young adulthood has become an eclectic musician whose works span genres from jazz to more traditional choral music.

This year, in advance of the ACDA Conference at the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis, Minnesota, Andrew chose to revise his large-scale work Gloria using Dorico, having prepared the original version in Finale. I caught up with Andrew to find out how he found the experience of moving his project over from Finale into Dorico.

Continue reading

Dorico showcase: pianist-composer David Ianni’s My Urban Piano project

Daniel Spreadbury

This post is part of a series that aims to shine a light on projects in which Dorico has played a part. If you have used Dorico for something interesting and would like to be featured in this series, please let me know.

David Ianni is a pianist-composer from Luxembourg who has undertaken a unique project celebrating the European Capitals of Culture, composing and performing pieces for solo piano and working with a local designer to produce a custom piano that will be given as a gift to each city. David has just released the second piece of twelve in the “My Urban Piano” series, and I caught up with him to find out more about the project, and how Dorico is playing its part.

Continue reading

Dorico 1.1 released with chord symbols, repeat endings and much more

Daniel Spreadbury

Dorico 1.1 has been released today. This fourth update to Dorico – following 1.0.10 in November, 1.0.20 in December, and 1.0.30 at the end of February, between them adding more than 500 improvements and fixes – is the most significant update yet, itself bringing many substantial new features and hundreds of smaller improvements.

Dorico 1.1 is a milestone in the maturity of our new professional scoring application, and introduces not only the most sophisticated support for chord symbols in any software, but also repeat endings, piano pedaling, editable note spacing, huge improvements to input and editing in Write mode, greatly expanded functionality for the piano roll editor in Play mode, and much, much more.

To give you a taste of what you can expect in Dorico 1.1, watch this overview video created by my colleague (and undisputed star of the Dorico YouTube channel) Anthony Hughes, who runs down the headline improvements in less than 10 minutes.

(If you simply can’t wait, you can go ahead and download the update, and read the comprehensive summary of every change in the Dorico Version History.)

Continue reading

Tutorial: Typesetting choral Preces and Responses in Dorico

Daniel Spreadbury

In this post I’m going to share the procedure to put together a performing edition of a set of Preces and Responses, based on the text of the Book of Common Prayer. The Preces and Responses are part of the choral evensong service in the Church of England and in Episcopal and Anglican churches around the world. They make an interesting case study for Dorico because they consist of a series of short versicles sung by a cantor, each one followed by a response sung by the choir, and this is an ideal fit both for Dorico’s multi-flow and page layout features.

The particular set of Responses I am going to produce is by William Smith, an English composer from the first half of the 17th century. The Smith Responses are often sung with a setting of the Lord’s Prayer written by Robert Stone, since Smith’s setting includes only a simple chanted version. I will be including Stone’s setting of the Lord’s Prayer in my performing edition. If you want to follow along exactly, you could use Sjouke Bruining’s edition on CPDL as a source: this edition uses the original note values, but I am going to halve the note values in my performing edition, as this reflects modern practice more closely.

Continue reading

Dorico showcase: BBC Proms Inspire winner Sam Rudd-Jones

Daniel Spreadbury

This post is part of a series that aims to shine a light on projects in which Dorico has played a part. If you have used Dorico for something interesting and would like to be featured in this series, please let me know.

We like to say that Dorico is the future of scoring software, and it is really gratifying to see a new generation of composers using Dorico to help bring their musical vision to life. Lincolnshire-based young composer Sam Rudd-Jones is still at school, but last year his work Angry won the Upper Junior category in the BBC Proms Inspire Competition 2016, which garnered him an opportunity that many more established composers will envy: a commission from the BBC for another piece, to be conducted by Rumon Gamba and which was broadcast on BBC Radio 3’s flagship contemporary music programme, Hear and Now, this past Saturday. I caught up with Sam to find out more about the commissioned work, Opposites Attract, which he produced in Dorico.

Continue reading

Dorico showcase: From Seattle to New York with Elizabeth Lain

Daniel Spreadbury

This post is part of a series that aims to shine a light on projects in which Dorico has played a part. If you have used Dorico for something interesting and would like to be featured in this series, please let me know.

At the beginning of April, a unique concert took place at Gallery MC in New York City, staged by Listening to Ladies, a collective founded by composer and visual artist Elisabeth Blair in 2015 on Facebook as a means of highlighting musical works by women composers. Since then, it has expanded into a daily online showcase, a podcast, and also a concert series, of which the concert in Manhattan is a part. The concert, presented in association with wind, brass and percussion ensemble Vent Nouveau, featured 10 works by women composers, selected from more than 200 scores submitted by over 140 composers.

Among those composers is Elizabeth Lain, who describes herself as a “composer, performer, rock oboist, and urban mermaid”. If that’s not a description that makes you want to find out more about an artist, I don’t know what is!

Continue reading

Dorico showcase: Choral music from a cathedral city

Daniel Spreadbury

This post is part of a series that aims to shine a light on projects in which Dorico has played a part. If you have used Dorico for something interesting and would like to be featured in this series, please let me know.

Chichester is a cathedral city in Sussex, on the south coast of England. With its cathedral dating back to the 12th century, it is one of dozens of similar cities around the United Kingdom with a long history of religious devotion, and religious music. Chichester Music Press is a publishing house founded in the city, run by Neil Sands, a composer, singer, organist, programmer, music typesetter, and, of course, proprietor of a publishing house!

Chichester Music Press’s catalogue already contains two works typeset in Dorico, so I wanted to find out from Neil how he has found using Dorico for publishing so far.

Continue reading

Page 1 of 512345